What’s New

  • Rethinking the Informal Economy

    ACET Researcher and Policy Advisor Julius Gatune recently joined the World Economic Forum's Global Strategic Foresight Community, which met for the first time last month in New York. The purpose of the meeting was to provide members with an opportunity to meet each other face-to-face, discuss their perspectives on global shifts, and develop a work-plan for the Community.

    As part of his work with the Community, Gatune has written on one of several “global shifts.” These shifts are topics or issues that Community members feel ...
  • Financing the Future: Fresh Perspectives on Global Development

    Financing the Future In partnership with ODI, UNDP, CEPEI, CABRI, ESRF, DFI and the Brookings Institution, ACET is hosting a conference on "Financing the Future: Fresh Perspectives on Global Development" on March 17 and 18, 2015, in Accra, Ghana. Given the changing nature and the proliferation of new sources and mechanisms of development finance, how can international public finance meet the challenges of our new era? To set the stage for these ...
  • Accelerating Regional Integration by Opening Borders

    West-africa-nasa In ACET’s African Transformation Report, we show that regional integration can be a very strong catalyst for economic transformation in Sub-Saharan Africa. One sure way to harness the potential gains of regional integration is for neighboring nations to band together and form regional ...
  • Rainfall Insurance for Smallholders in Northern Ghana

    NP Ghana 46 copy (5209276192) In Sub-Saharan Africa, climate change threatens to increase the probabilities of extreme weather events such as droughts and floods, and therefore to create more variability in crop production for farmers. In addition to starvation and extreme poverty, the lack of predictability in crop ...
  • How Should We Govern the Ghana National Petroleum Corporation (GNPC)?

    Worldwide, funding state participation in natural resource activities has three challenges: how to pay for that participation or the share of equity, how to set standards for accountability and transparency, and how to manage the fiscal risk if the state decides to borrow to pay for the equity. In its short history as an oil and gas producing economy, Ghana’s experience with the two state entities, the gas company (soon to be absorbed by GNPC) and petroleum corporation, echoes cautionary tales from elsewhere. Among the many lessons ...